It’s one of the most comforting and liberating parts of writing for wellbeing: there is no such thing as bad writing. You can’t ‘do it wrong’. The words you choose will always be right, because they are yours.

This is a very unfamiliar concept for most people. At school, the art of writing is highly celebrated – from correct spelling and grammar through to creative prowess. We expect our authors to craft compelling story lines and our poets to weave sweet lyrical treats. If they want people to read their work, these writers must demonstrate their mastery of the written word.

What a lot to live up to. Even as someone who has done plenty of writing in my lifetime, I still find the idea of sharing new work nerve-racking. What if people don’t like it? What if they think it’s too clunky, unclear, or boring?

The culprit, here, is a familiar one. It is my inner critic. When I’m writing professionally, this critic can (sometimes) serve me well. But when I’m writing for healing, for comfort or even for fun, I don’t want such a disrespectful detractor peering over my shoulder and jeering insults at every turn.

In the safe and healing space that is writing for wellbeing, the inner critic can be tamed. Spelling and grammar are irrelevant in this place. They don’t matter anymore. Writing becomes something that anyone can do. There is no need to fear judgement. ‘Right’ is whatever our hearts choose to put on the page.